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9

SEPTEMBER Issue

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benefit of recent tax credits and un-

der the right market circumstances,

CCS (carbon capture and sequestra-

tion) can be developed at a minimal

incremental net cost.

The Brattle study

shows that the value of CCS has the po-

tential to grow as utilities and a state fully

decarbonizes their systems. This value

will increase because, as renewable pen-

etration becomes material, the marginal

costs of decarbonization with only wind,

solar, and battery storage can become

very high. CCS may also help supply

decarbonization in settings where renew-

ables are not as abundantly available.

Therefore, the study authors suggest that

utilities should start to consider CCS in

their planning, anticipate the tradeoffs of

CCS with other emerging technologies,

and lay the long-run foundation for this

technology.“

– The Brattle Group/visit brattle.com.

“Many people think coal’s

time is over. I don’t think

that way

… Rather than

using the heating value of

coal, we can use the carbon

value of coal. My personal

view, is that it is too early in this effort to

go to zero or near-zero emission technol-

ogies and write off fossil energy and take

them out of the picture, because there

are technological advances that are be-

ing done – (carbon capture) for example

– that will make fossil energy technolo-

gies as clean, and maybe in some cases

cleaner, than what you get from renew-

ables. Coal could be used to manufac-

ture ceramic tiles and backyard decks.

Precious metals extracted from toxic coal

ash could be used to make iPhones and

other gadgets.”

– Steven Winberg, assistant secretary of

fossil energy, Department of Energy.

“In some regions where fuel diver-

sity is now gone, such as New Eng-

land, consumers are saddled with

some of the highest energy prices

in the country.

Winter electricity and

natural gas price spikes are a constant

fear. The New England grid operator is

scrambling to address an alarming fuel

security problem, going so far as to warn

that 30 percent of the region’s natural gas

generating fleet could be without fuel on

particularly cold days. That’s generating

capacity that millions of homes and busi-

nesses count on.”

– Count on Coal

(countoncoal@nma.org

)

“We applaud the Administration’s con-

tinued efforts to advance oil and gas

access in Alaska as part of an overall

plan to promote domestic production

of both traditional and renewable en-

ergy.

As the first major Arctic project to

advance this far by the Trump Adminis-

tration, Willow Project production could

provide access to valuable resources

in the National Petroleum Reserve in

Alaska and provide more throughput

in the Trans Alaska Pipeline System ---

helping to create more jobs for Alaskans,

revenue for the state and energy security

for the lower 48. The United States is not

only one of the largest producers of oil

and gas in the world, but also one of the

most efficient and environmentally sound

producers. For our economy to prosper

and environment to improve, US leader-

ship in oil and gas production is abso-

lutely essential.”

– President David Holt,

Consumer Energy Alliance.

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